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dc.contributorNot Applicableen_US
dc.contributor.authorSTASIEWICZ, PAUL R Principal Investigatoren_US
dc.date30-Apr-11en_US
dc.date2009en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-18T21:00:42Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-19T18:31:07Z
dc.date.available15-May-05en_US
dc.date.available2011-04-18T21:00:42Zen_US
dc.date.available2011-04-19T18:31:07Z
dc.date.issued2011-04-18T21:00:42Zen_US
dc.identifier7617263en_US
dc.identifier5R01AA015064-05en_US
dc.identifier15064en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10477/1052
dc.descriptionAbstinence;Accounting;addiction;Address;Adherence (attribute);Affect;Affective;Aftercare;Alcohol abuse;alcohol abuse therapy;Alcohol consumption;Alcohol dependence;Alcohol or Other Drugs use;alcohol relapse;alcohol use disorder;Alcohols;Anger;Anxiety;base;Behavior Therapy;Behavioral;biological adaptation to stress;Borderline Personality Disorder;Clinical;clinical effect;Clinical Management;Clinical Trials;Cognitive;Competence;conditioning;coping;Coping Skills;Data;Dependence;Depressed mood;depression;Development;distress tolerance;drinking;drinking behavior;Drug usage;Educational Intervention;Emotional;emotional stimulus;Emotions;Enrollment;Etiology;Euphoria;Excision;Expectancy;experience;Feedback;Feeling;Goals;Health;improved;Incentives;Indium;Individual;Instruction;Intervention;Interview;Label;Life Style;Maintenance;Manuals;Measures;men;Mental disorders;Methods;mindfulness;Modeling;Modification;negative emotional state;negative mood;Negative Reinforcements;NIH Program Announcements;Outcome;Participant;Patients;Pharmaceutical Preparations;Phase;Pilot Projects;Play;positive emotional state;Positive Reinforcements;Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders;problem drinker;Process;programs;Psychological reinforcement;Randomized;Randomized Clinical Trials;reduced alcohol use;Regulation;Relapse;Reporting;Research;Research Personnel;response;Review Literature;Role;satisfaction;Shame;skills;social cognitive theory;Staging;Substance abuse problem;Substance Use Disorder;Techniques;Testing;theories;Therapeutic;Therapeutic Intervention;Therapeutic Studies;therapy design;therapy development;Time;Training;treatment as usual;Woman;Writing;en_US
dc.descriptionAmount: $ 349054en_US
dc.description.abstractDESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Situations involving negative affect account for nearly half of all relapses to alcohol use among men and women engaged in alcohol treatment. Despite the key role of negative affect, there are currently no well-developed, empirically-tested, efficacious treatments that specifically attempt to reduce the impact of negative affect on relapse to alcohol use among alcohol dependent men and women. In the present study (submitted in response to the Program Announcement [PA 03-066] 'Behavioral Therapies Development Program'), we propose to develop and pilot test a clinical intervention that addresses the problem of negative affect as it relates to alcohol use and alcohol relapse. The goal of this project is to develop and test an intervention designed to assist individuals enrolled in alcohol treatment in regulating and coping with negative affective episodes that threaten relapse to alcohol use. In Phase 1 of the project (i.e., manual development phase), we will develop and refine a 12-session treatment manual for conducting Affect Regulation Training (ART), which will be delivered concurrent with a standard 12-session Treatment as Usual (TAU) for alcohol dependent men and women. During Phase 2 (i.e., pilot study), we will conduct a pilot study in which the outcomes of individuals participating in TAU + ART will be compared to individuals who receive TAU plus a Health and Lifestyle supplement (TAU + HLS). The development of a treatment enhancement intervention (i.e., ART) to address the problem of negative affect among alcoholics in treatment is consistent with the stated aims of the Program Announcement, which notes that an appropriate Stage 1 activity would be a 'therapeutic intervention that can be added to enhance an existing behavioral therapy.' The long-term objective of this line of research is to make available to clinicians a brief, effective affect regulation intervention that can be added to enhance existing empirically-supported treatments for alcohol dependence.en_US
dc.titleAFFECT REGULATION TRAINING FOR ALCOHOLICSen_US
dc.typeNIH Grant Awarden_US


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