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dc.contributorNot Applicableen_US
dc.contributor.authorSACHS, FREDERICK Principal Investigatoren_US
dc.date31-May-13en_US
dc.date2010en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-18T20:59:40Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-19T18:31:17Z
dc.date.available1-Sep-09en_US
dc.date.available2011-04-18T20:59:40Zen_US
dc.date.available2011-04-19T18:31:17Z
dc.date.issued2011-04-18T20:59:40Zen_US
dc.identifier7914265en_US
dc.identifier5R01HL054887-15en_US
dc.identifier54887en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10477/1080
dc.descriptionAccounting;Address;Animals;Arrhythmia;base;Biology;blood pressure regulation;Bulla;cell behavior;cell cortex;Cell Line;Cell membrane;Cells;Cellular Stress;Cholesterol;Cytoskeletal Proteins;Cytoskeleton;Data;Deafness;Disease;Edema;Electric Capacitance;Electrophysiology (science);Environment;Extracellular Matrix;Family;fluorescence imaging;Fluorescent Probes;Glaucoma;Hearing;Heat shock proteins;hemodynamics;Hypertension;Ion Channel;Ion Channel Gating;Kinetics;Label;Link;Lipid Bilayers;Maps;Measurement;Measures;Mechanical Stress;Mechanics;member;Membrane;Microscopy;Movement;Muscle Contraction;Muscular Dystrophies;Optics;patch clamp;Pathology;Physiology;potassium channel protein TREK-1;Preparation;pressure;Process;Property;protein expression;Proteins;public health relevance;Relaxation;research study;Resolution;Scanning;scanning ion conductance microscopy;Signal Transduction;Stress;stress protein;TimeLine;Touch sensation;Work;en_US
dc.descriptionAmount: $ 615704en_US
dc.description.abstractDESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Animal cell behavior is tightly linked to mechanical stresses produced by the environment and mechanochemistry illustrated most vividly by muscle contraction and hearing. There is an enormous amount of physiology and disease connected to forces and sensing including hemodynamics, coordinated movement, touch, cardiac arrhythmias, muscular dystrophy, edema, glaucoma, deafness, high blood pressure, etc. The cell cortex forms the interface between the environment and the cell and this project addresses the distribution of stress in the cell cortex and how it is sensed by mechanosensitive ion channels (MSCs). We will analyze how stress is shared by specific cytoskeletal proteins, the lipid bilayer, and sensed by mechanosensitive ion channels. The project has two specific aims directed at patches and whole cells and creating a basis for extrapolating from high resolution patch data to cell behavior. The patch experiments will localize different channels and cytoskeletal proteins within the patch; measure stress in cytoskeletal proteins as the patch is stressed; create patches with minimal cytoskeleton to simplify the stress distribution; measure and quantify endogenous and TREK-1 channel kinetics in terms of membrane tension; characterize the properties of microdomains within the patch using channel kinetics, patch capacitance, fluorescence imaging of labeled proteins and the stress in specific labeled cytoskeletal proteins. The whole cell experiments will use a combination of scanning conductance microscopy (SICM), whole cell patch clamp and fluorescent probes to examine the distribution of cytoskeletal proteins and channels and the stress in cytoskeletal proteins as the cell are stressed by the SICM. We will use MSCs calibrated in the patch as additional probes of bilayer stress. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: Mechanical forces in biology account for hearing, muscle contraction, blood pressure regulation and a great deal more. As expected for such ubiquitous processes, they are also involved in much pathology such as cardiac arrhythmias, high blood pressure and muscular dystrophy. This proposal analyses how stresses are distributed in molecules, membranes and cells and how that leads to signal transduction by ion channels.en_US
dc.titleCELL MECHANICS AND MECHANICAL TRANSDUCTION BY ION CHANNELSen_US
dc.typeNIH Grant Awarden_US


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