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dc.contributorTimothy E. Patten Program Manageren_US
dc.contributor.authorWatson, David Principal Investigatoren_US
dc.contributor.otherdwatson3@buffalo.eduen_US
dc.dateMarch 31, 2012en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-08T19:28:31Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-19T18:33:12Z
dc.date.availableApril 1, 2007en_US
dc.date.available2011-04-08T19:28:31Zen_US
dc.date.available2011-04-19T18:33:12Z
dc.date.issued2011-04-08T19:28:31Zen_US
dc.identifier0645678en_US
dc.identifier0645678en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10477/1163
dc.descriptionGrant Amount: $ 576100en_US
dc.description.abstractThis CAREER award by the Inorganic, Bioinorganic, and Organometallic Chemistry Program supports work by Professor David Watson at the University at Buffalo to study the photochemistry of self-assembled inorganic nanomaterials. The materials consist of quantum dots attached to metal oxide films through molecular linkers. The first study involves electron injection from photoexcited quantum dots into the metal oxide semiconductor. Time-resolved spectroscopic measurements systematically probe the influence of the composition, morphology, and physical properties of materials on the kinetics and efficiency of interfacial electron transfer processes. These fundamental studies may impact the design of quantum dot solar cells and nanostructured photocatalysts for solar energy conversion. The second area of research involves the photochemical degradation of surfactant molecules and its application towards the site-selective deposition of nanoparticles onto metal oxide surfaces. This photochemical patterning strategy addresses a significant challenge in nanofabrication, which is to control both short-range and long-range order within nanostructured materials. The research is integrated with an educational outreach program, in which Buffalo high school and middle school students engage in nanomaterials research projects. The outreach program creates expanded mentoring networks and promotes interest in science education and careers especially focused on the inclusion of Native American students. Other educational projects will include the development of a writing-intensive graduate course on the chemistry and physics of nanostructured materials and the initiation of a nanomaterials research forum at the University at Buffalo.en_US
dc.titleCAREER: Photoinduced Electron Transfer Processes in Self-Assembled Inorganic Nanomaterialsen_US
dc.typeNSF Granten_US


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