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dc.contributorH. Richard Lane Program Manageren_US
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Charles Principal Investigatoren_US
dc.contributor.othercem@buffalo.eduen_US
dc.dateMay 31, 2011en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-08T19:25:54Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-19T18:33:37Z
dc.date.availableJune 1, 2010en_US
dc.date.available2011-04-08T19:25:54Zen_US
dc.date.available2011-04-19T18:33:37Z
dc.date.issued2011-04-08T19:25:54Zen_US
dc.identifier0958308en_US
dc.identifier0958308en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10477/1220
dc.descriptionGrant Amount: $ 20519en_US
dc.description.abstractCollaborative Research: Graptolite Biogeography, Paleo-GIS, and Evolutionary Dynamics of Early Paleozoic Zooplankton Daniel Goldman, Dayton University, EAR-0958372 Charles Mitchell, SUNY, Buffalo, EAR-0958308 H. David Sheets, Canisius College, EAR-0957672 ABSTRACT Deep-time perspectives on climatic and oceanographic change are critical for understanding the long-term controls on environmental processes. This is particularly the case for the 'tipping points' that lead to episodes of climatic extremes, events that are often associated with episodes of profound biodiversity change. The spatial and temporal distribution of planktic organisms has proven to be critical to the reconstruction of climatic and oceanographic conditions during the Mesozoic and Cenozoic. The oldest geological period for which there is a diverse and abundant record of zooplankton is the Ordovician, and that record is provided by graptolites. PIs objectives are to analyze the changing biogeographic distribution patterns in graptolites from the mid-Ordovician into the lower Silurian using newly developing global databases, ecological modeling, and paleo-GIS techniques. Graptolite spatial distribution patterns should help understand the relationship between ancient ocean structure, climate, and zooplankton biogeography. Strong parallels have recently been drawn between the glacial-interglacial cycles of the Late Ordovician-Early Silurian and those of the late Cenozoic. Therefore, understanding the biogeographic and biodiversity changes associated with these climatic cycles will provide insights relevant to our understanding of biotic response to recent and modern climate change. Although this study will focus on the Ordovician and Early Silurian biosphere and its interconnections, the questions PIs propose to pursue - how range area and spatial patterning of faunas affect or respond to changing environmental history and species evolutionary dynamics - are fundamental questions that biologists and paleobiologists are pursuing across our traditional disciplinary boundaries of taxon, age, and conceptual approach.en_US
dc.titleCollaborative Research: Graptolite Biogeography, Paleo-GIS, and Evolutionary Dynamics of Early Paleozoic Zooplanktonen_US
dc.typeNSF Granten_US


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