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dc.contributor.otherGeorge Dreyfus, Facilitator, Religious Studies, Williams College Rebecca French, UB Law Andrew Huxley, (by remote telecast) Law, Centre of South East Asian Studies and Centre of Buddhism Studies, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London Frank Reynolds, History of Religions and Buddhist Studies, University of Chicago Divinity School Vesna Wallace, Religious Studies, University of California, Santa Barbaraen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-11T19:23:59Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:11:14Z
dc.date.available2011-10-11T19:23:59Zen_US
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:11:14Z
dc.date.createdThursday, September 21, 2006en_US
dc.date.issued2011-10-11en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10477/1411
dc.descriptionLittle has been written about the actual role of the Buddha as a judicial decision maker. What can we say about both the form and content of his style of decision making? How is this played out in Buddhist monastic communities? What texts, commentaries, and sutras are pertinent? How has the Buddha’s style of interpretation affected secular Buddhist legal systems, if at all? Also, how have the monastic communities’ own legal decision-making styles affected secular Buddhist legal systems? * George Dreyfus, Facilitator, Religious Studies, Williams College * Rebecca French, UB Law * Andrew Huxley, (by remote telecast) Law, Centre of South East Asian Studies and Centre of Buddhism Studies, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London * Frank Reynolds, History of Religions and Buddhist Studies, University of Chicago Divinity School * Vesna Wallace, Religious Studies, University of California, Santa Barbaraen_US
dc.format.mediumvideo, avien_US
dc.subject.classificationBuddha, Lawgiver, Social Change, Conscience, Self, Societyen_US
dc.titleDay2, Panel 1: The Buddha as Lawgiver: Monastic and Secular Communitiesen_US


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