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dc.contributor.authorGood, Jeff
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-29T20:50:40Z
dc.date.available2015-09-29T20:50:40Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.citationLingua 114: pp. 575–619.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10477/38478
dc.descriptionDOI: 10.1016/S0024-3841(03)00062-7en_US
dc.description.abstractSaramaccan, an Atlantic creole spoken in Surinam, has traditionally been analyzed as exhibiting a high-tone/low-tone opposition in its lexicon. However, while it is true that part of its lexicon exhibits a robust high/low opposition, the majority of its words are marked not for tone but pitch accent. The Saramaccan lexicon, therefore, is split with some words being marked for tone and other words marked for accent. This lexical split has important effects in the phrasal phonology of the language which, like the lexicon, is a mix between a tonal phrasal system and an accentual one.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.subjectSaramaccanen_US
dc.subjectprosodic phonologyen_US
dc.subjectphrasal phonologyen_US
dc.subjecttone and pitch accenten_US
dc.titleTone and accent in Saramaccan: Charting a deep split in the phonology of a languageen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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