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dc.contributor.authorGood, Jeff
dc.contributor.authorHendryx-Parker, Calvin
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-11T16:08:37Z
dc.date.available2015-10-11T16:08:37Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.citationGood, Jeff and Calvin Hendryx-Parker. (2006), Modeling Contested Categorization in Linguistic Databases, in ‘Proceedings of the EMELD ’06 Workshop on Digital Language Documentation: Tools and Standards: The State of the Art’. Lansing, Michigan. June 20–22, 2006.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10477/38511
dc.description.abstractA fundamental problem in the design of linguistic databases is finding effective ways to encode content which is of a contested nature—that is, content which involves data for which there is no general consensus on how it should be best interpreted. A clear example of such content is the grouping of languages into genealogical units. Numerous proposals abound, but only a relatively limited subset of these proposals are not, in some way, contested. For example, while current wisdom accepts the existence of numerous low-level genealogical units (e.g., Germanic or Algonquian) and a number of high-level units (e.g., Indo-European or Niger-Congo), there is no general consensus on the grouping of the larger families together or, for the most part, on the arrangement of the subgroupings within even relatively small families. There are proposals, of course, some of which have more support than others, but there is no consensus.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectlinguistic databasesen_US
dc.subjectlack of consensusen_US
dc.subjectcontested dataen_US
dc.subjectlinguistic typologyen_US
dc.titleModeling contested categorization in linguistic databasesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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