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dc.contributor.authorSturtevant, Kristin A.
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T20:17:12Z
dc.date.available2016-03-21T20:17:12Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.other304764804
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10477/43178
dc.description.abstractRiparian meadow systems in the Central Great Basin are of interest because they support the majority of ecosystem diversity in the region. The hypothesis for meadow formation and control is that sediments within the meadow and fault-related sub-surface bedrock steps at the downstream end of the meadow interact to constrict ground water. The objectives were to analyze the bedrock controls and the sediment influence, and illustrate that the use of multiple geophysical techniques is more advantageous than using one. Seismic reflection data and seismic refraction tomography data were collected to analyze bedrock, while ground penetrating radar (GPR) data were collected to determine the stratigraphic variability. Analysis of the seismic data showed a mix of bedrock controls and analysis of the GPR data showed a mix of sediment influences. However, the integration of these geophysical techniques is advantageous because they provide more information than could be obtained with the individual techniques.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.subjectEarth sciences
dc.titleIntegrating multiple geophysical methods to analyze geologic controls of riparian meadow complexes, Central Great Basin, Nevada
dc.typeDissertation/Thesis


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