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dc.contributor.authorMarch, Karen S
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-28T19:08:39Z
dc.date.available2016-03-28T19:08:39Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.isbn0542110326
dc.identifier.isbn9780542110320
dc.identifier.other305368524
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10477/45153
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to obtain information about faculty and staff giving practices at public institutions of higher education across the United States and its territories. Chief advancement officers at 563 public institutions were invited to participate in the study. One hundred sixty-four participants completed the study in which data were submitted via a web-based questionnaire. A Faculty and Staff Giving Questionnaire was utilized for data collection. The one-way beween-groups analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to determine if there were any differences in the percentage of faculty and staff giving based upon (a) institutional size; (b) Carnegie classification; or (c) geographical region of the country. Percentage of faculty and staff giving based upon manner of solicitation was addressed using descriptive statistics. Similarly, the likelihood of faculty and staff giving restricted versus unrestricted gifts was answered by descriptive statistics. The results of the data analysis revealed that percentages of faculty and staff giving differed significantly according to institutional size (faculty p < .05; staff p < .01) and Carnegie classification (faculty p < .01; staff p < .01). While percentage of faculty giving differed significantly across geographical regions ( p < .01), percentage of staff giving did not. Both faculty and staff were somewhat likely to give when solicited by a peer, department chair, the campaign chairperson or the President of the institution, while both groups were less likely to give when solicited by students. Both faculty and staff tended to give restricted gifts by a substantial margin over unrestricted gifts. Among campus beneficiaries of faculty and staff giving, academics, scholarships and special interest projects consistently ranked most prominently. Of those who participated in the study, just 76.8% reported that their institutions solicited faculty and staff for annual giving.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.sourceDissertations & Theses @ SUNY Buffalo,ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectFaculty
dc.subjectGiving
dc.subjectPublic institutions
dc.subjectHigher education
dc.subjectFund-raising
dc.titleA descriptive study of faculty and staff giving practices at public institutions of higher education within the United States
dc.typeDissertation/Thesis


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