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dc.contributor.authorMiao, Xinwei Michelle
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-28T19:08:55Z
dc.date.available2016-03-28T19:08:55Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.isbn9780542110214
dc.identifier.isbn0542110210
dc.identifier.other305380776
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10477/45191
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study is to explore how the concentration of neighborhood social disorganization sources affects the incidence of teenage childbearing in New York City using multilevel analysis with interactions. Hypotheses derived from social disorganization and social capital theories are tested. The aggregate level results indicate that adolescent childbearing rates are higher in neighborhoods with a concentration of residents of low SES, high residential mobility and minorities. The findings from multilevel analysis are mixed. Contrary to predictions from social disorganization theory, the impact of neighborhood social disorganization on childbearing incidence seems to evaporate especially for minority teens after individual background characteristics are taken into account. On the other hand, consistent with prior literature, low family income appears to have the most robust impact on teenage childbearing incidence among all the predictors. Possible explanations for the achieved results are discussed.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.sourceDissertations & Theses @ SUNY Buffalo,ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global
dc.subjectHealth and environmental sciences
dc.subjectSocial sciences
dc.subjectNeighborhood
dc.subjectChildbearing
dc.subjectNew York City
dc.subjectAdolescent pregnancy
dc.subjectSocial disorganization
dc.titleNeighborhood effects and teenage childbearing in New York City
dc.typeDissertation/Thesis


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