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dc.contributor.authorNutters, Daniel Rosenberg
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-29T17:17:59Z
dc.date.available2016-03-29T17:17:59Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.isbn9781109625851
dc.identifier.other305238647
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10477/45826
dc.description.abstractIn “On Some Motifs in Baudelaire” and The Arcades Project , Walter Benjamin recognizes Baudelaire for his allegorical genius and his cognizance of the cultural, historical, and societal changes taking shape in Paris. However, writing at the same time as Baudelaire, Herman Melville’s novels also reflect the multitude of change occurring in nineteenth-century America. Using several of Benjamin’s theoretical concepts: the flâneur, the collector, the allegorist, and the notion of aura, this study examines the ways in which three of Melville’s most canonical stories – Moby-Dick, Pierre , and “Bartleby” – interrogate, reflect, and respond to a burgeoning American modernity.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.sourceDissertations & Theses @ SUNY Buffalo,ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global
dc.subjectLanguage, literature and linguistics
dc.subjectAllegory
dc.subjectAura
dc.subjectBenjamin, Walter
dc.subjectMelville, Herman
dc.subjectMoby-Dick
dc.subjectModernity
dc.titleOn some motifs in Herman Melville
dc.typeDissertation/Thesis


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