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dc.contributor.authorMeyer, Jenna
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-29T17:18:19Z
dc.date.available2016-03-29T17:18:19Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.isbn9781124244969
dc.identifier.other759069287
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10477/45868
dc.description.abstractWith the sudden increase in popularity of vampire narratives, more works of literature and film are circulating within the space of popular culture. Yet where did the vampire character start and how has it been changed to still be relevant? The treatment of the vampire within a narrative varies by genre and creator. By researching the origins of the vampire folklores and mapping them through popular literature, it is established that the fictional monster has evolved over the centuries to its current state. The evolution reflects choices made by the respective authors, societal influences, as well as revisions of the traditional vampire role. While there is a clear distinction between traditional and old vampires, created before 1970 and the modern vampire, they share the same prototypical literary figure: Count Dracula. The major evolutionary difference is the lack of fear the modern vampire instills within its audience. *“When She was Bad.” Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Joss Whedon. WB Television Network. 15 September 1997. Television.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.sourceDissertations & Theses @ SUNY Buffalo,ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global
dc.subjectCommunication and the arts
dc.subjectLanguage, literature and linguistics
dc.subjectBuffy the Vampire Slayer
dc.subjectDracula
dc.subjectEvolution
dc.subjectHorror
dc.subjectTwilight
dc.subjectVampire
dc.title"You're a vampire... Was that an offensive term? Should I say "undead American"?" The evolution of the vampire in popular culture
dc.typeDissertation/Thesis


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