Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBosch, Allison E.
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-29T17:19:02Z
dc.date.available2016-03-29T17:19:02Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.isbn9781124032894
dc.identifier.other577642927
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10477/45966
dc.description.abstractIn 1960 the Martha Jackson Gallery put on an exhibition that was to change the course of art for the ensuing decade. Showcasing Junk Art and Assemblage, art composed of literally discarded objects and garbage, the Neo-Dada movement captured the zeitgeist of the New York art scene as it underwent a radical transition both aesthetically and conceptually. Entitled New Media—New Forms, this pair of exhibitions broke all the rules, laying the groundwork for the uninhibited sixties in which installation, performance, art and life were one and the same. Not often within history can one specific event be credited with such wide-ranging effects, but an analysis of the history and context surrounding New Media—New Forms proves it is an exception. This paper serves to demonstrate the impact that one person - in this case Martha Jackson - can have with a little ingenuity and an "eye" for art.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.sourceDissertations & Theses @ SUNY Buffalo,ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global
dc.subjectCommunication and the arts
dc.subjectMartha Jackson
dc.titleAn eye for art: Martha Jackson's new media - new forms exhibition
dc.typeDissertation/Thesis


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record