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dc.contributor.authorVincent, Donald E.
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-29T17:21:01Z
dc.date.available2016-03-29T17:21:01Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.isbn9781124034027
dc.identifier.other577645644
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10477/46230
dc.description.abstractTwo studies explored the role of religion in the decision to donate organs. In Study 1, a sample of 340 undergraduate students from public universities in New York State showed no relationship between religiosity and donation behavior. Thirty percent of undergraduates self-reported that religion could play a role in deciding whether or not to donate and only 9% were sure of their denomination's position on organ donation. In Study 2, a sample of 59 religious leaders from a variety of denominations in Rochester, New York was interviewed about organ donation. No leaders claimed that their denominations completely prohibit donation and nearly 90% claimed that they personally support donation in all circumstances. More than one-half of the leaders reported having discussed organ donation with members of their congregations, and nearly 97% claimed that they would feel comfortable discussing organ donation. The current research suggests that religion should be a positive force in the donation cause and religious leaders can play an active role in clearing up confusion about religious stances on organ donation.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.sourceDissertations & Theses @ SUNY Buffalo,ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global
dc.subjectPhilosophy, religion and theology
dc.subjectHealth and environmental sciences
dc.subjectCommunication and the arts
dc.subjectCollege students
dc.subjectOrgan donation
dc.subjectReligion
dc.subjectReligious leaders
dc.titleReligion and the decision to donate organs: Exploring the behaviors of college students and religious leaders
dc.typeDissertation/Thesis


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