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dc.contributor.authorRandolph, Gary L.
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-29T17:21:23Z
dc.date.available2016-03-29T17:21:23Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.isbn9781124034485
dc.identifier.other578488498
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10477/46278
dc.description.abstractThis descriptive study investigates the coverage of alternative energy by five major publications. The study is based on a content analysis of nearly 200 articles from The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, USA Today, Newsweek, and The Economist during 2009. A coding scheme is used to score content in three major areas, or frames: science and technology (S&T), policy, and economics. This scoring scheme measures depth of coverage within each frame and reveals large differences in both breadth and depth of coverage across publications. Political and policy biases are reported as discovered by an analysis of latent content. It is found that significantly more articles are written about anthropogenic climate change than about its obvious solution, alternative energy. A possible reason for why this is true is discussed. The reporting of wind and solar energy presents special problems for an author, including concepts like energy versus power, and steady versus intermittent supplies. These issues are clarified and discussed. Keywords. energy, climate change, content analysis, topic framing, the commons.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.sourceDissertations & Theses @ SUNY Buffalo,ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global
dc.subjectCommunication and the arts
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectApplied sciences
dc.subjectClimate change
dc.subjectCommons
dc.subjectEnergy
dc.subjectMedia coverage
dc.titleEnergy: A public discussion
dc.typeDissertation/Thesis


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