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dc.contributor.authorHill, Sharon A.
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-31T14:19:30Z
dc.date.available2016-03-31T14:19:30Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.isbn9781124474847
dc.identifier.other854069639
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10477/46900
dc.description.abstract21 st century television and the Internet are awash in content regarding amateur paranormal investigators and research groups. These groups proliferated after reality investigation programs appeared on television. Exactly how many groups are active in the U.S. at any time is not known. The Internet provides an ideal means for people with niche interests to find each other and organize activities. This study collected information from 1000 websites of amateur research and investigation groups (ARIGs) to determine their location, area of inquiry, methodology and, particularly, to determine if they state that they use science as part of their mission, methods or goals. 57.3% of the ARIGs examined specifically noted or suggested use of science as part of the groups’ approach to investigation and research. Even when not explicit, ARIGs often used science-like language, symbols and methods to describe their groups’ views or activities. Yet, non-scientific and subjective methods were described as employed in conjunction with objective methods. Furthermore, what were considered scientific processes by ARIGs did not match with established methods and the ethos of the scientific research community or scientific processes of investigation. ARIGs failed to display fundamental understanding regarding objectivity, methodological naturalism, peer review, critical thought and theoretical plausibility. The processes of science appear to be mimicked to present a serious and credible reputation to the non-scientific public. These processes are also actively promoted in the media and directly to the local public as "scientific". These results highlight the gap between the scientific community and the lay public regarding the understanding of what it means to do science and what criteria are necessary to establish reliable knowledge about the world.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.sourceDissertations & Theses @ SUNY Buffalo,ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectSocial sciences
dc.subjectAmateur
dc.subjectInternet
dc.subjectParanormal
dc.subjectScientific research
dc.titleBeing scientifical: Popularity, purpose and promotion of amateur research and investigation groups in the U.S.
dc.typeDissertation/Thesis


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