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dc.contributor.authorAscherl, Andrew
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-01T20:52:05Z
dc.date.available2016-04-01T20:52:05Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.isbn9781267456465
dc.identifier.other1029839814
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10477/47738
dc.description.abstractIn this dissertation, I analyze works by three transnational Mexican novelists: Los detectives salvajes (2000) by Roberto Bolaño, Héroes convocados: manual para tomar el poder (1982) and the Héctor Belascoarán Shayne series (1976–1993) by Paco Ignacio Taibo II, and El amante de Janis Joplin (2001) by Élmer Mendoza. These novels, in their thematic focus on the aftermath of the period of global artistic and political upheaval in and around 1968, address the question of what remains of innovative ruptures in politics and the arts after such ruptures have ended. Chapter one, "Beyond Finitude: Towards a New Theory of Reading," foregrounds the analysis of a number of post-1968 Mexican novels through an examination of several prominent critical themes within Latin American literary studies, focusing in particular on themes that reflect on the end of popular social movements. This introductory chapter takes as one of its tasks a reconfiguration of the subject of literature in general, insofar as it elaborates a theory of infinite literary subjectivity. I show that this transfinite conceptualization of the literary subject results from a rupture in the finite field of literature itself, a rupture that expresses the transtemporal and thus infinite quality of that which breaks from its finite conditions. In the context of Mexico in 1968, this infinite expression is nothing more than the universal demand for democracy taken up by students and workers. Ultimately, this chapter insists on promoting new ways of reading Mexican narrative in the aftermath of the end of the student-popular movement precisely because of the ways in which the constellation of social, political, and artistic thought was fundamentally altered by the events of 1968 in Mexico, as well as elsewhere around the globe. Chapter two, "The Time of the Avant-Gardes: Roberto Bolaño's Los detectives salvajes ," examines Roberto Bolaño's Los detectives salvajes , a narrative that follows a small group of Mexican avant-garde poets from 1976 to 1996. At stake in Bolaño's novel is the representation of the interrupted continuity between vanguard artistic movements within the narrative framework of the novel. Although both the historical and neo-avant-gardes of 20th-century Mexican poetry are presented in Los detectives salvajes as fixed and ultimately failed historical specificities, the novel in fact challenges the perceived stability of avant-garde temporality, using the protagonists' search for the avant-garde "founding mother" poet Cesárea Tinajero to reconceptualize the relation of time and artistic subjectivity. I analyze Bolaño's novel to demonstrate not only the way it rethinks the status of transnational Latin American artists in the post-1968 era, but also to show that the novel explores new considerations of avant-garde temporality that allow the reader to question conventional narratives of artistic innovation in general. Chapter three, "Ethics, Politics, and Violence: Elmer Mendoza's Narco-Literature," examines the cultural mediation of violence in a number of narrative works dealing with the ethical and political consequences of the Mexican drug war as it has developed over the past thirty years. In novels which offer parallel narratives of the armed guerrilla movements of the 1970s and the assassination of presidential candidate Luís Donaldo Colosio in 1994, Mendoza's narco-narratives highlight the violence and corruption which the Mexican state under PRI domination consolidated itself after the student uprising of 1968. I show that Mendoza's work presents a contemporary form of pre-modern Greek tragedy to mediate the realities of post-1968 Mexico during a period in which emancipatory political movements were absent and the one of the primary results of NAFTA and the so-called democratic transition within the Mexican political establishment has been the rise powerful drug cartels which have challenged the state's monopoly on violence. In the tragic narratives of Cada respiro que tomas, Un asesino solitario , and El amante de Janis Joplin , Mendoza's work constitutes a literary attempt to think the interim between periods of militant political subjectivity in the post-1968 era. The final chapter, "'A Spectre is Haunting Mexico': Paco Ignacio Taibo II and Literary Fidelity," analyzes a number of Taibo's novels, placing special emphasis on Héroes convocados and the early books of the Héctor Belascoarán Shayne detective series. These novels depict the various struggles of characters clearly marked by the Mexican student popular movement of 1968 to come to terms and move past the movement's abrupt, violent end. My analysis demonstrates how Taibo's novels utilize the genre of detective fiction to comment upon the disappearance of Mexico's greatest political movement since the Revolution of 1910–1920, and how these texts seek to articulate new political identities within the context of the restoration of the Partido Revolucionario Institucional's political dominance. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)
dc.languageEnglish
dc.sourceDissertations & Theses @ SUNY Buffalo,ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global
dc.subjectLanguage, literature and linguistics
dc.subjectBadiou, Alain
dc.subjectBolano, Roberto
dc.subjectLatin American literary theory
dc.subjectMendoza, Elmer
dc.subjectMexican literature (20th century)
dc.subjectMexico
dc.subjectTaibo, Paco Ignacio, II
dc.subjectTransnational narrative
dc.titleTo have done with finitude: Transnational Mexican narrative after 1968
dc.typeDissertation/Thesis


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