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dc.contributor.authorFarley, Katie Elizabeth
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-01T20:52:43Z
dc.date.available2016-04-01T20:52:43Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.isbn9781267457042
dc.identifier.other1029865707
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10477/47832
dc.description.abstractThe need for new energy sources is more dire now than it has ever been. The dependency on fossil fuels has become a crutch for this economy, and has taken its toll on the environment as well. New energy sources such as solar and wind have become more prevalent. The issue with these new energies is that they are intermittent. They do not provide a constant flow of energy and thus need batteries in order to store the energy produced for down periods. Electrochemical research has therefore become a rapidly growing field in which there are still many unanswered questions. The search for the perfect battery is a never ending endeavor. The Takeuchi group has undertaken this task with a focus on energy sources for implantable cardiac defibrillators. The combined efforts of Kenneth Takeuchi, Esther Takeuchi, and Amy Marschilok are pushing to find appropriate compounds as possible cathodes while also attempting to understand how the system itself works. For example, what kind of effects active materials, electrolytes and separators may have on the battery system. The focus of Katie Farley's work is on determining suitable active materials as potential cathodes in Lithium metal and Li-ion batteries. The attempt was to synthesize low cost materials at a low temperature while still retaining the ability to fine tune physical characteristics in order to optimize the electrochemical performance. This paper is divided into two main sections. The first section is on the synthesis, characterization, and electrochemical evaluation of silver ferrite. Two crystallite sizes were created and the attributes of each size are compared. The second section is actually comprised of two different materials; sodium iron pyrophosphate and silver iron pyrophosphate. The two materials were synthesized, characterized, and electrochemically evaluated. The investigation of the sodium analog was done in order to fully understand how the silver analog performed.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.sourceDissertations & Theses @ SUNY Buffalo,ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global
dc.subjectPure sciences
dc.subjectElectrochemistry
dc.subjectSilver ferrite
dc.subjectSilver iron pyrophosphate
dc.subjectSodium iron pyrophosphate
dc.titleSynthesis, characterization, and electrochemical applications of silver ferrite, sodium iron pyrophosphate, and silver iron pyrophosphate
dc.typeDissertation/Thesis


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