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dc.contributor.authorHenderson, L Daisy
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-05T16:18:17Z
dc.date.available2016-04-05T16:18:17Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.isbn9780542772290
dc.identifier.other304938896
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10477/49476
dc.description.abstractResearchers have long determined that the presence of social networks and informal social control mechanisms affect the outcome and well-being of children in neighborhoods. More specifically, levels of collective efficacy defined as trust, solidarity and the willingness to intervene on behalf of a public good among residents influences the quality of life of children. However, there has been little empirical research about the existence of collective efficacy for foster children who face numerous emotional, mental, educational and social challenges compared to other children who are indigenous to the neighborhood. Additionally, lacking within current literature is a portrait of the social, economic and demographic variables of neighborhoods as they relate to foster children. Thus, through research which began first as an ethnographic study on block clubs in the City of Buffalo, and the data prepared by the Center for Development of Human Services (CDHS), this thesis conducts a spatial examination of neighborhoods in the City of Buffalo where foster homes (N=480) placements took place. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)
dc.languageEnglish
dc.sourceDissertations & Theses @ SUNY Buffalo,ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.subjectImplicit cognition
dc.subjectCollege drinking
dc.subjectModeration
dc.subjectAlcohol use
dc.subjectSensitivity to reward
dc.titleEnhancing neighborhoods for children: Foster homes and block clubs in Buffalo, New York
dc.typeDissertation/Thesis


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