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dc.contributor.authorHaug, Ryan W.
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-05T19:11:13Z
dc.date.available2016-04-05T19:11:13Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.isbn9781303474255
dc.identifier.other1460308934
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10477/50268
dc.description.abstractThis study examined whether individuals attend to different behavioral clues to deception depending on the type of relationship and the stakes of the lie. Participants were instructed to imagine a hypothetical deceptive situation in which the type of relationship and the stakes associated with the lie systematically varied. The general results from 206 participants revealed that relationship type does not have a significant effect on the types of cues people focus on to detect deception. However, internal analyses revealed that participants would attend more to cognitive-based cues to detect deception when interacting with a stranger compared to a friend, but only in low stakes situations. Further analyses indicated that participants would attend more to behavioral control-based cues to detect deception when interacting with a stranger compared to a friend, but only in high-stakes situations. A discussion of the results, limitations for the study and recommendations for further research are presented.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.sourceDissertations & Theses @ SUNY Buffalo,ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global
dc.subjectCommunication and the arts
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.subjectBehavioral clues
dc.subjectCognition
dc.subjectCue
dc.subjectDeception
dc.subjectEmotion
dc.subjectRelationships
dc.titleThe liar you know: The role of relationship on perceptions of deceptive cues
dc.typeDissertation/Thesis


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