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dc.contributor.authorKrause, Jillene Ann
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-05T19:14:02Z
dc.date.available2016-04-05T19:14:02Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.isbn9781267946218
dc.identifier.other1317008201
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10477/50659
dc.description.abstractMotivational language theory is the depiction of employee motivation derived from leader's social performance (Sullivan, 1988). In particular, Sullivan argues that leader's execution of three key speech acts impair or promote employee motivation, including (a) uncertainty-reducing language, (b) meaning-making language, and (c) empathic language. As most research on motivating language has been conducted solely within the United States, the current study employs respondents from the United States and Singapore to compare across cultural groups the effects of Sullivan's key speech acts on (a) organizational commitment, (b) job satisfaction, (c) absenteeism, and (d) intent to stay at an organization. Participants included 357 employees from varied organizations across the United States (n=181) and Singapore (n=176). The current findings indicate that supervisor's use of motivating language across these two cultural contexts similarly affects employees' commitment to their organizations, job satisfaction, and intent to stay, though it does not affect absenteeism. Keywords: motivation, organizational commitment, job satisfaction, absenteeism, intent to stay
dc.languageEnglish
dc.sourceDissertations & Theses @ SUNY Buffalo,ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global
dc.subjectSocial sciences
dc.subjectCommunication and the arts
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.subjectAbsenteeism
dc.subjectCross-cultural
dc.subjectIntent to stay
dc.subjectJob satisfaction
dc.subjectMotivation
dc.subjectOrganizational commitment
dc.titleMotivating language theory: A cross-cultural comparison
dc.typeDissertation/Thesis


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