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dc.contributor.authorRomeo, Monica L.
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-05T19:58:31Z
dc.date.available2016-04-05T19:58:31Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.isbn9781321922684
dc.identifier.other1709473517
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10477/51484
dc.description.abstractThe problem of college student suicide is a complex and challenging issue faced by all college counseling centers. Objective: The purpose of this research is to examine the overall challenge of college student suicide, scrutinize the suicide assessment methods currently available to college campuses and to provide an overview of one suicide prevention/intervention program in use at a college campus. Method: This researcher utilized Seidman's (2006) methods of analyzing data for this study. Themes uncovered were linked to the research question, which is the focus of this dissertation: In what ways are campus professionals able to articulate their lived experience of utilizing skills acquired during QPR training to assist their students during times of suicidal crisis? The following section will discuss the findings of this study. This researcher utilized the technique of individual interviews to ascertain in what ways are campus professionals able to articulate their lived experience of utilizing skills acquired during QPR training to assist their students during times of suicidal crisis. Results: Examination of participant interviews resulted in the discovery of several themes associated with the interaction between campus professionals and their training in QPR gatekeeper intervention. Analysis of the data retrieved from interviews with campus professionals revealed the themes of compassion, and awareness- consciousness in relation to the experience of personal effects of QPR training. Additionally, analysis of the data retrieved from interviews with campus professionals revealed the themes of awareness - signs, knowledge, and the learning of new skills relating to the experience of professional effects of QPR training. Lastly, an analysis of the data retrieved from interviews with campus professionals revealed the themes of relationship impact, crisis recognition, and referring in relation to the experience of QPR on campus professionals with students in crisis. Conclusions: This study is an important contribution to the field of crisis intervention, particularly in relation to how campus professionals intervene with students in crisis. While this study was able to document the personal experience of campus professionals regarding their personal and professional experience with the QPR gatekeeper training program, a need continues to exist to document the experience of people on college campuses who intervene with students in crisis. Suicide is the second leading cause of death among college students (The Jed Foundation, 2014). Continuing to educate university communities on the importance of this topic and allowing the university community to experience technique and skill acquisition to assist community members is essential to creating and maintaining positive university communities.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.sourceDissertations & Theses @ SUNY Buffalo,ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.subjectHealth and environmental sciences
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectCampus professionals
dc.subjectCollege student crisis
dc.subjectQuestion, persuade, and refer
dc.titleA review of the experience of campus professionals' use of the Question, Persuade, and Refer (QPR) gatekeeper training program in a small university setting
dc.typeDissertation/Thesis


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