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dc.contributor.authorArslan, Engin
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-23T20:23:01Z
dc.date.available2017-08-23T20:23:01Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.isbn9781339857640
dc.identifier.other1809102088
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10477/76185
dc.description.abstractAs the data requirements of commercial and scientific applications continue to increase at an unprecedented rate, obtaining optimal end-to-end data transfer performance becomes of crucial importance for a broad range of data-intensive applications. Achieving optimal end-to-end data transfer performance requires effectively utilizing the available network bandwidth and resources, yet in practice the transfers seldom reach the levels of utilization they potentially could. Tuning protocol parameters such as pipelining, parallelism, and concurrency can significantly increase the network utilization and the transfer performance, however determining the best combination for these parameters is a challenging task since that would depend on several factors such as network characteristics (i.e. bandwidth, RTT, background traffic), dataset characteristics (i.e. file size, number of files), and end system characteristics (i.e disk speed, number of disks, number of processors, I/O block size, TCP buffer size). In this dissertation, we present novel algorithms for application-level tuning of protocol parameters to maximize the data transfer throughput especially in wide-area networks. The contributions of this research include: (1) analysis and prediction of optimal protocol parameter combinations based on the dataset and network characteristics using historical data as well as real-time data; (2) algorithms to cluster the datasets into comparable partitions and transfer multiple partitions concurrently for maximum transfer throughput where the transfer parameters for each partition is optimized individually; (3) dynamic monitoring of the instantaneous data transfer throughput and online tuning of the protocol parameters to detect and remedy possible transfer slowdowns. We have developed several heuristic solutions that estimate the application-layer protocol parameters, including the number of parallel data streams per file (for large file optimization), the level of control channel pipelining (for small file optimization), and the level of concurrent file transfers to fill the long fat network pipes (for all files). The developed algorithms employ novel techniques to group and transfer set of files in order to yield the maximum possible transfer throughput. In order to minimize the negative effect of “lots of small files” on the average data transfer throughput obtained, we have introduced the “multi-chunk concurrency (MC)” technique, which partitions the dataset into chunks considering the file sizes and number of files in the dataset, and transfers certain chunks concurrently. In the “proactive multi-chunk (ProMC)” technique, we dynamically change allocation of chunks among TCP channels to improve the overall performance of concurrency by balancing the small and large chunks. And, in the “max-fair multi-chunk (FairMC)” technique, we aim to make use of the concurrent chunk transfers as well as keeping the network and end-system utilization at a fair level. The experimental results show that our proposed heuristic algorithms outperform state-of-art solution by up to 5 times. Although the heuristic solutions boost the data transfer throughput for networks with stable or predictable background traffic, they fall short to optimize the data transfers when network conditions change unpredictably. To address this issue, we propose predictive end-to-end data transfer optimization algorithm based on historical data analysis and real-time background traffic probing, dubbed HARP. Combining historical data analysis with real time sampling enables our algorithms to tune the application level data transfer parameters accurately and efficiently to achieve close-to-optimal end-to-end data transfer throughput with very low overhead. Our experimental analysis over a variety of network settings shows that HARP outperforms the best heuristics by up to 50% in terms of the achieved throughput.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.sourceDissertations & Theses @ SUNY Buffalo,ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global
dc.subjectApplied sciences
dc.subjectData transfer optimization
dc.subjectHigh performance data transfers
dc.subjectPerformance
dc.subjectProtocol
dc.subjectTuning
dc.titleDynamic protocol tuning algorithms for high performance data transfers
dc.typeDissertation/Thesis


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