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dc.contributor.authorMehrvarz, Mahan
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-23T20:23:05Z
dc.date.available2017-08-23T20:23:05Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.isbn9781339858364
dc.identifier.other1810128820
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10477/76192
dc.description.abstractStreet movements have been traditionally taken place within the physical realms of cities, and often start or end with a form of civil disobedience. Considering the integration of new technologies in our daily lives, in 1994, Critical Art Ensemble – a group of tactical media practitioners – stated in their Electronic Civil Disobedience manifesto that: “…Streets are dead capital and nothing of value to the power elite can be found in the streets. Resisters should find something of a value to the power elite”. However, more recent movements (from 2009 to 2012) around the world showed that fully-virtual civil disobedience model that Critical Art Ensemble pictured in its manifesto does not meet protesters’ desires. Additionally, these recent movements did not follow the traditional civil disobedience model (like storming bastille). Instead, the recent social movements and civil disturbances (of any form and in any geographical region) have been following a model that includes both digital and physical components. To re-emphasize, this fact demonstrates the role of digital spaces in this millennium. On the other hand, following Foucault’s and Deleuze’s ideas on discipline and control, one can see that street movements have to deal with authorities’ attempts in controlling the crowd and terminating the movement. This opens up two other aspects of street movements: control and resistance. To control protesters in streets, authorities have developed riot-control tactics. These tactics include riot-control scenarios and a number of tools (traditional and technological) associated with each scenario. To resist, people have also developed ad-hoc tools that neutralize control tools. However, there is a noticeable difference between the number of technologies that authorities have access to and those available to protesters during street protests. On top of the shortage in resources that protesters have to deal with, there is a lack of advance planning and design for street protests as a spatial collective activity. It seems that designers have never considered this condition as a design problem. The primary goal in this thesis is to look into the cohabitation of digital and physical space as a design opportunity. Investigating street movements/protests as a design context will be my focus and throughout this investigation, new technologies will be the main design characteristic. Hence, technology, the marriage between digital and physical, and street protest are three major aspects of my thesis. This Thesis seeks to understand how the application of communication technologies, the Internet of things, pervasive computing, and sensory devices can create a mixed-reality urban environment, which provides the opportunity for protesters to remain in streets and act and respond to authorities more effectively within public spaces.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.sourceDissertations & Theses @ SUNY Buffalo,ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global
dc.subjectSocial sciences
dc.subjectCommunication and the arts
dc.subjectCivil disobeidance
dc.subjectInternet of things
dc.subjectPervasive computing
dc.subjectScenario planning
dc.subjectStrategic planning
dc.subjectStreet protest
dc.titleNot Another Tool
dc.typeDissertation/Thesis


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