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dc.contributor.authorAliasgarian, Anahita
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-23T20:23:07Z
dc.date.available2017-08-23T20:23:07Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.isbn9781339858326
dc.identifier.other1810128833
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10477/76195
dc.description.abstractSeeking to question the over-reliance of designing space based on the arrangement of visual elements, this study intends to emphasize “sound” as the primary medium for spatial creation. While space is inherently mute without activity, human interaction with space encompasses often neglected aural qualities that embody the material and geometrical features of space. We can hear architecture by the way that the space changes a sound’s spectrum intensity, and temporal sequence. This thesis is concerned with research in the fields of auditory spatial perception, physical material and audio signal processing, bringing together the seemingly disparate disciplines of architecture and electronic music. Digital audio synthesis enables converting acoustics into electronics which entails embedding audio sensing technologies in the building structure, transforming architecture into an interface between human and computer. Given the auditory data of a tactile activity, one can manipulate the sound of the activator to mimic the effects that an implicit space would produce on it. The body of research consists of a study of the technical effects a space produces on activator sounds along with a series of experiments, capturing and manipulating the inherent resonances of different materials caused by haptic interaction. The final outcome is an installation that offers an audio-tactile experience through an acoustically responsive platform with the desire to provide the visitors with an altered spatial perception that is audible.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.sourceDissertations & Theses @ SUNY Buffalo,ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global
dc.subjectPure sciences
dc.subjectSocial sciences
dc.subjectCommunication and the arts
dc.subjectArchitecture
dc.subjectAudible space
dc.subjectAugmented space
dc.subjectAural architecture
dc.subjectSound
dc.subjectSoundart
dc.titleAuditory augmented space
dc.typeDissertation/Thesis


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