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dc.contributor.authorGhosh, Natasha
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-23T20:26:43Z
dc.date.available2017-08-23T20:26:43Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.isbn9781339481357
dc.identifier.other1766579650
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10477/76538
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines the problem of delay in Hamlet from a psychoanalytical and poststructuralist perspective in order to understand why Hamlet delays and what role the Ghost plays in this problem. The paper shows how the critical trends dealing with Hamlet’s delay shift from the external factors of plot construction to the internal factors of characterization, and how the final destination of this curving trend is the Ghost. This paper shows how the Ghost, an authority whose word Hamlet can neither trust, internalize or assimilate is rather like Freud who can neither trust, internalize or assimilate Shakespeare’s model of the human mind and psyche as the predecessor and progenitor of his own because he is plagued by the anxiety of being derivative. This raises the question of authorship. According to Barthes, Hamlet is written not by Shakespeare alone but by all who read it. Therefore the father, the pater who Freud and Hamlet both try to reject becomes Hamlet himself and Hamlet becomes the Ghost, because the Ghost is anamorphic and exists only in the context of Hamlet.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.sourceDissertations & Theses @ SUNY Buffalo,ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global
dc.subjectLanguage, literature and linguistics
dc.subjectAuthorship
dc.subjectHamlet and the ghost
dc.subjectHamlet's delay
dc.subjectHarold bloom and anxiety of influence
dc.subjectMarjorie garber and anamorphosis
dc.subjectSigmund freud and oedipal complex
dc.titleSweet dreams, Hamlet
dc.typeDissertation/Thesis


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