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dc.contributor.authorBang, Chulhwan
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-23T20:20:29Z
dc.date.available2018-05-23T20:20:29Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.isbn9781369593808
dc.identifier.other1877998761
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10477/77596
dc.description.abstractMy dissection defense is divided into two parts. The first is related to the Egyptian Civil Movement in 2011 and the second is related to a framework for presenting discipline and classification of Information Systems articles using keywords provided by authors or words extracted from content. Among the three essays, the first two essays study the roles of social network services as communication channels of protest. The reason I became particularly interested in the Egyptian civil movement was that, whereas the civil movements in other Arab countries were frustrated or failed, the Egyptian civil movements dramatically developed in the shortest period of time and eventually succeeded in defeating the Mubarak regime. In the first essay, I focused on a dual pathway of protest during the Egyptian social revolution of 2011. Social network services such as Twitter mobilized people to protest in order to resist Hosni Mubarak’s government. This essay studies how people’s sentiments have an impact on the utterance of protest or support of protest. The essay explores differing types of emotional sentiments in tweets that signal protests. I focus on two pathways—the emotional and goal-seeking pathways of Twitter conversations. I carried out a study of how protests are signaled by differing types of emotional sentiments and goal-related expressions for both English and Arabic tweets. Using sentiment analysis, the investigation is carried out over different data sets in Arabic and English. The second essay focuses on conflicts during social movement. As everyone knows, the Egyptian revolution was successfully completed. It was possible because, even with differences in sex, religion, and age, everyone demanded the resignation of Mubarak and his regime. As stated in the first essay, emotions were a major factor that triggered the participation of the Egyptian people in the civil movements and of the conflicts between protesters at the same time. The regimes encouraged conflict between protesters in order to disrupt the protesters and to weaken their motivation. Conflicts were used as a deterrent to successful civil movements. Therefore, in the second essay, I examine types of conflicts revealed during the Egyptian civil movement and emotions which affect the conflicts. The last essay investigates disciplines of Information Systems research and text in the research, such as keywords. Keywords are important to understand research since they indicate the characteristics of articles and are also used as a tool to classify the discipline of research. Studies of the IS discipline have been sparse since Barki induced a hierarchy of IS research disciplines. Barki published his first hierarchy in 1993 and updated it twice in 2003 and 2005. Since 2005, we have undergone major changes such as the Internet of Things and the spread of electronic commerce and the mobile age. The IS studies after 2005 also reflect these changes, but a new scheme to classify the IS studies has not been suggested yet. So we suggest a hierarchy that reflects the new changes.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.sourceDissertations & Theses @ SUNY Buffalo,ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global
dc.subjectApplied sciences
dc.subjectProtest
dc.subjectProtests
dc.subjectSentiment analysis
dc.subjectSocial media
dc.subjectText mining
dc.titleThree Essays on Information Systems: The Egyptian Protest in 2011 and a Framework forKeyword Analysis and Classification
dc.typeDissertation/Thesis


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