Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBrown, Sharon
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-23T20:20:33Z
dc.date.available2018-05-23T20:20:33Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.isbn9780355047080
dc.identifier.other1925961360
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10477/77606
dc.description.abstractSchool reform efforts continue to evolve with more accountability being placed on school districts along with principals and teachers. However, there is a dearth of literature focusing on how school reform consequences affect a principal’s self-identity and whether there are any human costs associated with a principal’s involuntary transfer due to the school’s failing status. The purpose of this study was to examine how principals coped with their involuntary transfers from failing schools and to determine the human costs, if any, on the principals. An involuntary transfer is one in which the principal is transferred from one failing school and assigned to another school or a central office position within the same school district. A theoretical framework was utilized to identify a principal’s antecedent conditions, cognitive appraisals, and coping mechanisms. The model aided in categorizing the principals’ reactions to their involuntary transfers or removals from their schools. This phenomenological study was located in a large urban school district in WNY where 17 semi-structured interviews were conducted. The study revealed that the former or current principals overall appraised their involuntary transfers as a Threat (negative), Challenge (positive) or Unaffected (indifferent). The data gleaned from the study include critical information to shape and implement policy surrounding how school reform ultimately affects a principal, which may lead to unintended human consequences.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.sourceDissertations & Theses @ SUNY Buffalo,ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectInvoluntary transfers of principals
dc.titleThreat or Challenge Principals' Reactions to Their Involuntary Transfers from Failing Schools
dc.typeDissertation/Thesis


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record