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dc.contributor.authorAdamo, Josephine P.
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-23T20:21:07Z
dc.date.available2018-05-23T20:21:07Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.isbn9781369592627
dc.identifier.other1877634487
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10477/77688
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to explore the contribution of non-academic variables (personal responsibility, motivation, self-management, interdependence/support, self-awareness, lifelong learning, emotional intelligence, and belief in self) to the success of the first year college student. Six hundred and sixty-two (622) first year students enrolled in a first year seminar course participated in the study. A pre-post survey was used to investigate three research questions: 1) Are there differences in Personal Responsibility, Motivation, Self-Management, Interdependence/Support, Self-Awareness, Lifelong Learning, Emotional Intelligence and Belief in Self based on race, gender, commuter status, first-generation status and athlete vs. non-athlete? 2) Do first year students’ acceptance of Personal Responsibility, Motivation, Self-Management, Interdependence/Support, Self-Awareness, Lifelong Learning, Emotional Intelligence and Belief in Self change from the beginning of the first semester to the end of the first semester after participating in a first year course emphasizing non-academic variables known to have a positive influence on student success? 3) Are there differences in GPA and persistence for those whose scores on the variables of Personal Responsibility, Motivation, Self-Management, Interdependence/Support, Self-Awareness, Lifelong Learning, Emotional Intelligence and Belief in Self change positively or negatively over the course of the semester? Data collected were analyzed using a series of ANOVA’s for question 1 and 3 respectively, and a paired t-test for question 2. Results indicated that a first year seminar course emphasizing non-academic variables known to contribute to college success has a positive effect on first year student’s end-of-semester GPA. Also, students enrolled in the first year seminar course persisted to their second year at a greater rate than those non-participants.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.sourceDissertations & Theses @ SUNY Buffalo,ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectAcademic success
dc.subjectCollege student
dc.subjectFirst-year
dc.subjectHigher education
dc.subjectNon-cognitive
dc.subjectPersistence
dc.titleUnderstanding the contributions of non-academic variables to the success and persistence of first-year, first-semester college students
dc.typeDissertation/Thesis


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