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dc.contributor.authorAlmarghlani, Ammar AbdulBasit
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-23T20:21:13Z
dc.date.available2018-05-23T20:21:13Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.isbn9780355044935
dc.identifier.other1925909935
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10477/77701
dc.description.abstractBackground: Periodontal disease is a complex multifactorial disease involving gram-negative anaerobic bacteria that can lead to the destruction of tooth supporting tissue. Tissue-resident macrophages are important for both homeostasis and coordinating an immune response. IL-34 is a ligand for CSF1R, and is capable of supporting the viability and differentiation of macrophages from monocytes in the absence of the canonical ligand M-CSF. IL-34 is important for the development of epidermal immunity, including in the oral environment, and is produced by gingival tissue at higher levels than M-CSF in response to inflammatory conditions. However, any role for IL-34 in modulating monocyte and macrophage function in gingival tissue during the development of periodontal disease in terms of cytokine expression and response to the pathogen Porphymonas gingivalis are unknown. Aim: Determine the differences in the cytokine response as well as the ability of IL-34- and M-CSF-matured macrophages to phagocytose and destroy the oral pathogen P. gingivalis . Materials and Methods: Human mononuclear cells were isolated from whole peripheral blood obtained from healthy donors and were differentiated into macrophages using either M-CSF or IL-34. The P. gingivalis uptake and intracellular clearance capability of macrophages was determined by an antibiotic protection-based assay. Flow cytometry analysis was performed on differentiated macrophages to quantify cell surface proteins known to interact with P. gingivalis , and ELISA assays were used to test for cytokine release differences between the macrophage types upon interaction with P. gingivalis . Results: IL-34 has the capability to differentiate human peripheral blood monocytes into macrophages as efficiently as M-CSF. However, IL-34 differentiated macrophages showed a significantly lower ability to internalize P. gingivalis , kill those bacteria that were engulfed, and expressed lower levels of inflammatory cytokines such as TNF, than macrophages matured with M-CSF. Conclusion: These results suggest the presence of IL-34 in gingival tissue can play a role in altering infiltrating monocyte development during the progression of periodontal disease leading to an altered ability to effectively deal with pathogenic microbes.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.sourceDissertations & Theses @ SUNY Buffalo,ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global
dc.subjectBiological sciences
dc.subjectIL-34
dc.subjectInterleukin
dc.subjectMacrophages
dc.subjectPhagocytosis
dc.subjectPorphyromonas gingivalis
dc.titleEffects of IL-34 vs M-CSF Maturation on Macrophage Interactions with Porphyromonas gingivalis
dc.typeDissertation/Thesis


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