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dc.contributor.advisorZhao, Ruogang
dc.contributor.authorHsia, Isaac
dc.contributor.author0000-0002-1996-5043
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-28T15:54:31Z
dc.date.available2018-06-28T15:54:31Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.date.submitted2018-05-08 15:10:31
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10477/77926
dc.descriptionM.S.
dc.descriptionThe full text PDF of this thesis is embargoed at author's request until 2020-06-08.
dc.description.abstractFibrosis is a severe disease characterized by excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix and stiffening of the tissue during wound healing. It often leads to organ failure and has a high mortality rate. Development of new anti-fibrosis therapies is a highly inefficient process, as no existing in vitro models can accurately recapitulate the dynamic patho-physiological changes in tissue mechanics during fibrogenesis. In this study, we created novel micropillar microdevices, which allow thin and membranous fibroblast microtissues to be formed, similar to the morphology of lung alveolar tissue. We show the capability of these devices to replicate the fibrogenesis process, by using TGF-β1 to induce compliant lung microtissues into a rigid and contractile condition that matches that of interstitial lung fibrosis. Two drugs in phase II clinical trial for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, which have been shown to potentially possess anti-fibrotic properties, are used to treat the fibrotic microtissues. Both drugs provided significant reduction in contraction forces, ECM production, and stiffness of the fibrotic tissues. The results indicate that these microdevices can model the dynamic process of fibrogenesis on a multiscale level and is therefore an excellent platform for screening potential anti-fibrotic drugs.
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherState University of New York at Buffalo
dc.rightsUsers of works found in University at Buffalo Institutional Repository (UBIR) are responsible for identifying and contacting the copyright owner for permission to reuse. University at Buffalo Libraries do not manage rights for copyright-protected works and cannot assist with permissions.
dc.subjectBiomedical engineering
dc.subjectBiomechanics
dc.titleMicrofabricated Fibrotic Microtissue Array for Screening of Potential Anti-Fibrotic Treatmentsen_US
dc.typeThesis
dc.typeText
dc.rights.holderCopyright retained by author.
dc.contributor.departmentBiomedical Engineering


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