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dc.contributor.authorHutchins, Jeffrey
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-30T19:01:54Z
dc.date.available2018-08-30T19:01:54Z
dc.date.issued2018-09-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10477/78254
dc.descriptionUB SON, DNP Capstone Projecten_US
dc.description.abstractProblem: Communication trends are changing and gaps in knowledge exist about patient attitudes toward provider communications, particularly involving young adults. Objective: To explore patient attitudes toward provider communications and compare short message service ΟΓ "texting'', to the existing means of communication email, telephone and voicemail. Framework: PDSA, or "Plan, Do, Study, Act" framework was used for this quality assurance project. Project design: Face to face interviews were used to gather data in a university health center. Basic demographic data such as age, gender and preferred first language were gathered. Α series of multiple choice, ranking and open ended questions were then assessed to compare the variables. Analysis: Content analysis, descriptive statistics and chi square tests were used to describe the results and compare the variables .Data were analyzed with Microsoft Excel and ΙΒΜ SPSS version 25 software. Results: Based on face to face interviews witl1 81 individuals, participants felt that email communications were the most secure while text based communications were preferred in areas of convenience, likeliness to respond in a timely fashion, and being least likely to miss or ignore. Phone communications ranked highest over text by a 6 percent margin when participants were asked how they would like to be reached on an urgent basis. Implications: Text based communication may be a viable, even preferred method for young adults to receive communications related to their healthcare needs.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity at Buffalo, School of Nursingen_US
dc.subjectTextingen_US
dc.subjectcommunicationen_US
dc.subjectmHealthen_US
dc.subjectmillennialsen_US
dc.subjectcollege healthen_US
dc.subjectlab resultsen_US
dc.titleEvaluating Patient Preferences and Attitudes toward Communication Methods in a University Health Centeren_US
dc.typeOtheren_US
dc.typeText


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