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dc.contributor.advisorEinarsson, Erik
dc.contributor.authorKarmakar, Arka
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-04T20:32:28Z
dc.date.available2019-04-04T20:32:28Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.date.submitted2019-01-15 17:11:46
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10477/79403
dc.descriptionPh.D.
dc.description.abstractGraphene, which is a planar or 2D allotrope of carbon, is actually the buildingblock of graphite. Graphene has potential applications in many fields, such as highfrequencyfield-effect transistors, flexible electronics, touch panels, optoelectronicdevices, energy storage devices, and wearable technology. Despite such promise,most of the graphene-based applications to date are limited to either theoreticalwork or laboratory research. This is due to the many challenges related tofabrication of graphene-based devices.Continuous graphene is a necessity for many electrical and optical applications.These applications, however, are built upon substrates that are not suitablefor graphene growth. As a result, graphene must be transferred from its growthsubstrate (usually Cu foil) to a different substrate (such as a silicon wafer). Transfertechniques often introduce defects in graphene, such as wrinkles, cracks, and voidsor holes. To address this problem, we developed a wet graphene transfer method inwhich we add a copolymer to poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) prior to transfer.Unlike previously reported wet methods, we show that adding a copolymer layeratop a PMMA layer before transfer improves graphene continuity by virtuallyeliminating cracks and holes. The result, as determined by quantitative imageanalysis, is 99.8% continuous graphene over a 1 cm × 1 cm area.In addition to its many unique electronic properties, graphene can sustainTHz-frequency plasmons at room temperature. In an attempt to exploit this property for THz communication, we have demonstrated a hybrid graphene–metalreflectarray structure. In this reflectarray, the active elements are metal andgraphene reduces the reflected power by destroying the confinement. Lastly,we investigate all-graphene plasmonic antenna arrays, and propose an array ofsuspended graphene regions to realize plasmonic resonant cavities.
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dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherState University of New York at Buffalo
dc.rightsUsers of works found in University at Buffalo Institutional Repository (UBIR) are responsible for identifying and contacting the copyright owner for permission to reuse. University at Buffalo Libraries do not manage rights for copyright-protected works and cannot assist with permissions.
dc.subjectElectrical engineering
dc.subjectMaterials Science
dc.titleTerahertz Hybrid Graphene–Metal Reflectarrays
dc.typeDissertation
dc.typeText
dc.rights.holderCopyright retained by author.
dc.contributor.departmentElectrical Engineering


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