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dc.contributor.advisorShepard, Mark
dc.contributor.authorSesselmann, Janette
dc.contributor.author0000-0002-8607-4021
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-04T20:32:32Z
dc.date.available2019-04-04T20:32:32Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.date.submitted2019-01-16 10:15:12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10477/79408
dc.descriptionM.S.
dc.description.abstractIn the following work I elaborated on the development of mass protests during the independent years of post-Soviet Ukraine - a state that has faced major economic, socio-political, and cultural changes during the transitional period after the collapse of the USSR. This ultimately led to an ongoing negotiation process of new national identities and gradually resulted in the so far last revolution Ukraine has faced in 2013/14, the so-called Revolution of Dignity.In comparison with the architectural history of Maidan Square, the physical center of the protests, the analysis of the spatial connection between Maidan’s built environment and the governmental policy-making will represent the essence of this thesis. The assumption that Maidan could be a representation of a governmental suppression, non-temporarily manifested in architecture, is suggested in this work. It also carries this argument a step further by exploring the questions about power relations, ownership and identity embedded in the architecture of Maidan. The ground of this premise is the simple reflection of the political and cultural context in which these structures came into being with an emphasis on the strategic importance of architectural elements during the revolution when the square was occupied by the demonstrators as a formalization of protest.My research started with a sociological fieldwork in the form of several interview sessions with local architects, urban planners, former and current activists, students, and journalists.
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherState University of New York at Buffalo
dc.rightsUsers of works found in University at Buffalo Institutional Repository (UBIR) are responsible for identifying and contacting the copyright owner for permission to reuse. University at Buffalo Libraries do not manage rights for copyright-protected works and cannot assist with permissions.
dc.subjectArchitecture
dc.subjectPolitical science
dc.subjectUrban planning
dc.titleMANIFESTATION OF POLITICAL POWER IN ARCHITECTURE AT THE EXAMPLE OF MAIDAN NEZALEZHNOSTI IN KYIV
dc.typeThesis
dc.typeText
dc.rights.holderCopyright retained by author.
dc.contributor.departmentArchitecture


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