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dc.contributor.advisorGrizzard, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorAhn, Changhyun
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-30T15:11:02Z
dc.date.available2019-07-30T15:11:02Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.date.submitted2019-05-10 14:13:00
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10477/79910
dc.descriptionPh.D.
dc.description.abstractDespite investigating various aspects of video games and characters featured in these games, the past decade of studies has not been free of the input/output problem suggested by Grodal (2000). The input/output problem of video games suggest that the output-dominant nature of video game might result in participants who are assigned to play exact same video game experiencing entirely different content: Notably, this problem can be exacerbated especially in between-subjects designs with 2 or more video gaming conditions. Modifying and coding in-game features in order to customize for specific lab experiments has been a great challenge for academic researchers of video games. In order to solve this problem, this dissertation suggests a simple solution called an ‘exo-game manipulation.’ Exo-game manipulations provide additional narrative background that seems likely to exist outside the actual video game play. Study 1 developed initial stimuli for testing the effectiveness of an exo-game narrative using the popular press video game Heavy Rain. Study 2 and Study 3 further tested exo-game manipulations with a different video game and different characters using TellTale’s the Walking Dead video game series. Exo-game manipulations can alter perceptions of content, dependent variables based on that content, and in-game decisions. Methodological implications and guidelines for utilizing exo-game manipulations are discussed; ultimately, this dissertation provides evidence that using exo-game narratives can bypass the input-output problem.
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherState University of New York at Buffalo
dc.rightsUsers of works found in University at Buffalo Institutional Repository (UBIR) are responsible for identifying and contacting the copyright owner for permission to reuse. University at Buffalo Libraries do not manage rights for copyright-protected works and cannot assist with permissions.
dc.subjectCommunication
dc.titleBypassing the ‘Input-Output’ Problem: Validating Exo-Game Manipulations of Video Games for Social Science Experiments
dc.typeDissertation
dc.typeText
dc.rights.holderCopyright retained by author.
dc.contributor.departmentCommunication


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