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dc.contributor.advisorKiviniemi, Marc
dc.contributor.authorKlasko-Foster, Lynne
dc.contributor.author0000-0002-2607-7351
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-30T15:11:54Z
dc.date.available2019-07-30T15:11:54Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.date.submitted2019-05-17 10:52:56
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10477/80020
dc.descriptionPh.D.
dc.description.abstractPerceived risk, which has cognitive, affective, and experiential components, is hypothesized to be a central influence on decision making about health behavioral engagement. However, risk is typically measured solely in cognitive terms. Oftentimes, objective risk appraisals do not match cognitively-based subjective risk appraisals. Thus, individuals at increased risk for a negative health outcome, such as a sexually transmitted infection (STI), may not choose to perform a preventive behavior, even if they could greatly benefit from its use. As such, it is plausible that a better understanding of how individuals feel about their personal risk for STIs (affective components of risk) or their gut-level assessment of personal vulnerability (experiential risk) may shed light on the disconnect between increased risk for STI acquisition and lack of behavioral engagement in primary prevention strategies. Three studies were conducted to accomplish the following aims: 1) to assess how the interplay between affective and cognitive components of the perceived risk construct impact primary prevention strategies for young adults in a population with an average risk distribution for STIs; 2) to assess how the interplay between affective, cognitive, and experiential components of the perceived risk construct impact primary prevention strategies for adults in a high risk population for STIs; 3) to explore how affect (feelings), cognitions (beliefs), and experiential risk (heuristics) associated with negative health outcomes related to STIs shape risk judgments.
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherState University of New York at Buffalo
dc.rightsUsers of works found in University at Buffalo Institutional Repository (UBIR) are responsible for identifying and contacting the copyright owner for permission to reuse. University at Buffalo Libraries do not manage rights for copyright-protected works and cannot assist with permissions.
dc.subjectPublic health
dc.titleThe Influence of Perceived Risk on Behavioral Decision Making to Engage in Primary Prevention of Sexually Transmitted Infections (HPV and HIV)
dc.typeDissertation
dc.typeText
dc.rights.holderCopyright retained by author.
dc.contributor.departmentCommunity Health and Health Behavior


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